#coneyisland #brooklyn #lunapark

livelymorgue:

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

artruby:

Olafur Eliasson, Riverbed, (2014) at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.
artruby:

Olafur Eliasson, Riverbed, (2014) at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.
artruby:

Olafur Eliasson, Riverbed, (2014) at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.
artruby:

Olafur Eliasson, Riverbed, (2014) at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.

artruby:

Olafur Eliasson, Riverbed, (2014) at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.

hyperallergic:

Santiago Cirugeda’s “Spider” building is part of Al Jazeera’s new six-part documentary called “Rebel Architecture,” which documents the stories of architects “who believe architecture can do more than iconic towers and luxury flats — turning away from elite ‘starchitecture’ to design for the majority.” Architizer has a short summary of episode 1. (via AlJazeera.com) (via Required Reading)

artruby:

Darek Błaszczyk & Bartek Macias, Spiral, (2013). artruby:

Darek Błaszczyk & Bartek Macias, Spiral, (2013). artruby:

Darek Błaszczyk & Bartek Macias, Spiral, (2013).

artruby:

Darek Błaszczyk & Bartek Macias, Spiral, (2013).

newmuseum:

Ziad Antar’s photographs probe the production of images, their role as documentation, and their symbolic relationship to time passing within the urban environment. For “Here and Elsewhere,” Antar presents the “Expired” series, which began in 2000 with the artist’s visit to Studio Shehrazade in Saïda, the workshop of renowned Lebanese studio photographer Hashem El Madani (b. 1928). From El Madani, Antar purchased a 1948 Kodak Reflex II camera and ten rolls of medium format, black-and-white film that had expired in 1976. For nearly a decade, Antar experimented with this film in different vintage cameras during his travels to Cairo, Dubai, and Sharjah, producing grainy, painterly reflections of light and shadow.

Ziad Antar, Mecca II, from the “Expired” series, 2005. Gelatin silver print, 19 3/4 x 19 3/4 in (50 x 50 cm). Courtesy the artist and Selma Feriani Gallery, London 

theparisreview:

“What you’re buying isn’t privileged access: it’s only a set of jejune bragging rights.”

Dan Piepenbring on J. D. Salinger and the fascination with dead authors’ homes.

rebeccataylorny:

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s “Aujourd’hui le monde est mort [Lost Human Genetic Archive]” at @palaisdetokyo. #teamfitz (at Palais de Tokyo)

artandsciencejournal:

Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
artandsciencejournal:

Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
artandsciencejournal:

Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
artandsciencejournal:

Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal:

Personal Planets

When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.

The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.

Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.

-Anna Paluch

whitneymuseum:

Art Everywhere U.S. continues through August—keep your eyes peeled for works from our collection!
whitneymuseum:

Art Everywhere U.S. continues through August—keep your eyes peeled for works from our collection!
whitneymuseum:

Art Everywhere U.S. continues through August—keep your eyes peeled for works from our collection!
whitneymuseum:

Art Everywhere U.S. continues through August—keep your eyes peeled for works from our collection!

whitneymuseum:

Art Everywhere U.S. continues through August—keep your eyes peeled for works from our collection!